11 Proven Health Benefits of Garlic

Ancient civilizations have long known about garlic’s health benefits, and its use dates back thousands of years. These Benefits of eating garlic are believed to be largely due to the sulfur compounds found in garlic. Allicin is the most well-known sulfur compound, but other compounds, such as diallyl disulfide and s-allyl cysteine, are also involved. For now, these compounds are still unidentified, but they are believed to have some benefits. Allicin Studies have shown that the active compound in garlic, allicin, has numerous health benefits. It can prevent or treat certain types of cancer, lower cholesterol, and blood pressure, and even aid in ulcer healing. But, before taking any garlic supplement, you should speak to your doctor. Because these supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, they may not be as effective as garlic itself. Some of the side effects of allicin include stomach upset and bleeding. Blood vessel health Garlic can benefit blood vessels by improving their elasticity and stiffness. In a recent study, researchers found that daily consumption of aged garlic extract increased endothelial function and decreased arterial stiffness. This result is important because impaired endothelial function is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Moreover, garlic supplements increased the levels of the antioxidant coenzyme Q10. Immune system Research has shown that taking a daily dose of garlic may boost the immune system. This herb is low in calories and high in vitamin C, manganese, and trace minerals. Supplementation of garlic may boost the immune system, helping to prevent illness. In one 12-week study, garlic supplementation reduced the incidence of colds by 63%, and the average length of cold symptoms was cut by 70 percent and 1.5 days, respectively. Taking garlic supplements may also reduce the risk of chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and other inflammatory conditions. Cholesterol Several studies have shown that the consumption of garlic has cholesterol-busting effects. Researchers at Penn State University have studied the relationship between garlic and cholesterol for over a decade. The results of their study show that garlic contains an active compound called allicin. This compound has anti-inflammatory and blood thinning properties, and is especially effective in preventing heart disease and controlling cholesterol levels. Although the evidence for the cholesterol-busting properties of garlic is still largely limited, some studies have suggested that it is effective at preventing and treating heart disease. Insulin resistance A study has shown that the aging process of garlic increases the production of a compound called aged garlic extract (AGE), which has pharmacological benefits. This substance was studied in mice with abnormal glucose tolerance and HFD diets. Although AGE did not affect body weight or dietary intake, it did significantly improve insulin resistance. It also normalized serum levels of nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide. The findings of the study suggest that the use of garlic may have important therapeutic benefits for people with diabetes. Brain health The compounds in garlic, including diallyltetrasulfide, are strong antioxidants. In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, the compound aged garlic extract protected brain cells from damage caused by oxidative stress. This process has been associated with many serious disorders, including strokes and Alzheimer’s disease. Garlic may protect the brain from this damage, keeping it sharper for longer. Digestive health Garlic is known to have medicinal properties and is often used in cooking. Its antibacterial properties have been known for ages, but only recently have scientists begun to understand its full potential for digestive health. Garlic is naturally high in inulin, a type of functional fiber that feeds the friendly bacteria in the digestive tract. Those bacteria help regulate bowel function, reduce cholesterol levels, and protect the body from disease-causing bacteria.